Dec. 17th, 2012

swatkat: (korra: because i love lin bei fong)
+ This story about Cliff Chiang drawing Black Canary for a fan is the cutest thing ever*. Even if I generally want comics!Ollie to be far, far away from my Dinah.

* Except today's Gunnerkrigg Court, which is beyond adorable. <33333

Speaking of which, I have seen the second episode of Arrow, and it is still quite fun. Ollie is still very pretty, Stephen Amell is still hilariously bad most of the time (his angsty voiceovers, my god), his inappropriate chemistry with his sister is still inappropriate but also gripping (the only scenes where his acting works, as far as I'm concerned), and his Hamlet backstory is still ridiculous and cheesy (he cannot be the man his mother wants him to be! because he has to be the man his ~father wanted him to be). I do like the actor who plays Dinah Laurel a lot, and her relationship with her father has excellent potential, I think. I hope they tell us eventually that her mother was the first Black Canary - followed, obviously, by her taking up the mantle.

+ I continue to make my way through OUAT S1. It's great fun, and spoilers till 1.13 )

+ HIMYM 8.10 )

+ ribbonspooncat's thoughts on Bering and Wells (there is a moving gif in the link - I used Readability for better reading)

ladyshinkicker's thoughts on Bering and Wells:



So, HG Wells is actually a woman – she provided the ideas, her brother provided the moustache, but who wrote the books? Each of them bears Helena’s name, but we know that she was bronzed before all of HG Wells’ books were published. Her exact status – author or muse – is ultimately an ambiguous one, and I know that this is a plothole which some fans like to criticise the writers for, but I honestly think it works. Helena isn’t quite a muse, she isn’t quite an author, and she isn’t quite a character: her presence queers the narrative (many of her lovers were men; many of her characters were men; many of her authors were men) but it also deconstructs the act of narration itself. She’s introduced before she’s ever introduced – Myka read HG Wells’s novels, Pete’s seen the movies, and Myka spots ‘Edward Prendick’ in the guestbook. Pete’s Genre Savvy, he knows how this works, but he’s still thinking in terms of actors and performance and guesses; Helena can’t quite stay away and the pseudonym she uses is her real name. When she introduces herself as Helena, that’s an implicit admission of her identity as HG Wells as well as a denial. They’re looking for Charles, the one with the moustache, but they’re calling him HG – she is HG, but she isn’t, too. Identity is never that simple for her.


ladyshinkicker's thoughts on HG Wells:

I think that she works brilliantly within the narrative as a sort of ghostly presence, lurking in all of the dark places and threatening to huff and puff and bring down the narrative around them – and, through that haunting, serves to shore up the narrative itself. Helena is the act of deconstruction and she is constantly deconstructed – what else is left, when the story tears itself apart, begins again, and rips that one up too?

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